The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

What is the Value of Knowledge Management Practices?  pp567-574

Fahmi Ibrahim, Vivien Reid

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

What are the appropriate sources from which to draw evidence about Knowledge Management (KM) and its added value to organisations? This paper attempts to answer this question, first examining the literature for approaches to measuring KM from the perspective of Intellectual Capital (IC) theory. However, findings indicated that many measurement methods or frameworks have limitations. Following the literature review, the researchers then approached KM practitioners, within the UK car manufacturing industry, and undertook in‑depth interviews in an attempt to understand how these organisations value their KM practices. The UK car manufacturing industry was selected because little previous research has been undertaken in this context, most previous studies having concentrated mainly on service industries. It was discovered that, in most of the organisations studied, the link between KM, business benefits and bottom line is almost axiomatic, especially amongst those who are enthusiastic advocates of KM. Drawing on the evidence from the in‑depth interviews, the paper concludes that there is an absence of linking mechanisms between value and measurement. This is due to the differences between the concept of a value and measurement approach and the importance of these two concepts to justify the outcome of KM practices. Recommendations are made through the development of a theoretical framework that includes both objective and subjective dimensions of KM measurement strategy.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, intellectual capital, uk car manufacturing industry, theoretical framework, value, measurement

 

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Journal Article

Human Resource Management Practices and Organizational Innovation: Assessing the Mediating Role of Knowledge Management Effectiveness  pp155-167

Cheng Ling Tan, Aizzat Mohd Nasurdin

© Apr 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ICICKM 2010 special issue, Editor: W.B. Lee, pp85 - 180

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Abstract

Organizational innovation has been viewed as an essential weapon for organizations to compete in this competitive business environment. Particularly, Malaysia manufacturing firms strive to transform their business model from labor‑intensive to knowledge‑intensive, which aim to immerse themselves in higher value added activities such as, developing new products, processes, and services, to continual sustain the competitiveness within the rivalries. One of the ways to heighten the organizational innovation is through effective human resource management (HRM) practices and effective knowledge management. This study examined the direct relationships between HRM practices (performance appraisal, career management, training, reward system, and recruitment) and organizational innovation (product innovation, process innovation, and administrative innovation). Additionally, it also examined the mediating role of KM effectiveness on the direct relationship. Data was drawn from a sample of 171 large manufacturing firms in Malaysia. The regression results showed that HRM practices generally have a positive effect on organizational innovation. Specifically, the findings indicate that training was positively related to three dimensions of organizational innovation (product innovation, process innovation, and administrative innovation). Performance appraisal also found to have a positive effect on administrative innovation. Additionally, this study also demonstrates that training and performance appraisal, are positively related to knowledge management effectiveness. Knowledge management effectiveness fully mediates the relationship between training and process innovation, training and administrative innovation, and performance appraisal and administrative innovation. A discussion of the findings, limitations, and implications are provided.

 

Keywords: human resource management practices, product innovation, process innovation, administrative innovation, knowledge management effectiveness, Malaysian manufacturing firms

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital in Manufacturing and Service Firms of the Dominican Republic: An Exploratory Approach  pp198-208

Victor Gómez-Valenzuela

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, Guest Edited Issue, Editor: Dr. Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro and Dr. David Cegarra-Leiva, pp171 - 253

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper analyses 64 variables related to the intellectual capital of manufacturing and service firms in the Dominican Republic. In addition, the study included 10 control variables related to firms characteristics, and 10 variables related to firms performance, for a total of 84 variables. The main findings show that business performance in manufacturing firms relies mainly on relational capital and depends to a lesser extent on human capital, and that innovative performance depends on a closer relation between human and structural capital. In the case of service firms, both business and innovative performance rely on structural and relational capital, indicating the role of suppliers as a potential source of innovations.

 

Keywords: Keywords: intellectual capital, Dominican Republic, manufacturing and service firms

 

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Journal Article

Crowdsourcing User‑Contributed Solutions to Aerospace Product Development Issues through Micro‑Blogging  pp126-136

Richard David Evans, James Xiaoyu Gao, Sara Mahdikhah, Mourad Messaadia, David Baudry

© Jun 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, Editor: Ken Grant, pp89 - 158

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Abstract

Abstract: Revenue and production output of the United Kingdoms Aerospace Industry (AI) is growing year on year and the need to develop new products and innovative enhancements to existing ranges is creating a critical need for the increased utilisation and sharing of employee knowledge. The capture of employee knowledge within the UKs AI is vital if it is to retain its pre‑eminent position in the global marketplace. Crowdsourcing, as a collaborative problem solving activity, allows employees to captur e explicit knowledge from colleagues and teams and also offers the potential to extract previously unknown tacit knowledge in a less formal virtual environment. By using micro‑blogging as a mechanism, a conceptual framework is proposed to illustrate how c ompanies operating in the AI may improve the capture of employee knowledge to address production‑related problems through the use of crowdsourcing. Subsequently, the framework has been set against the background of the product development process proposed by Maylor in 1996 and illustrates how micro‑blogging may be used to crowdsource ideas and solutions during product development. Initial validation of the proposed framework is reported, using a focus group of 10 key actors from the collaborating organisa tion, identifying the perceived advantages, disadvantages and concerns of the framework; results indicate that the activity of micro‑blogging for crowdsourcing knowledge relating to product development issues would be most beneficial during product concep tualisation due to the requirement for successful innovation.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Aerospace Manufacturing, Crowdsourcing Knowledge, Employee Collaboration, Knowledge Management, Micro-Blogging

 

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Journal Article

International Lessons in Knowledge Management: A Study of Western & Eastern Manufacturing SMEs  pp113-130

Chayaruk Thanee Tikakul, Avril Thomson

© Sep 2018 Volume 16 Issue 2, The Management of IC and Knowledge “in action”, Editor: Dr Maria Serena Chiucchi and Dr Susanne Durst, pp73 - 154

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Abstract

In today’s competitive business market, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are seeking to adopt supporting tools in order to survive. Many large organizations have been successfully implementing Knowledge Management with productivity and efficiency gains cited. SME’s on the other hand are less familiar with this practice with fewer published studies of Knowledge Management focusing on SMEs. Studies which draw global comparisons of Knowledge Management practices in SME’s are particularly rare. The aim of this study is to identify and investigate similarities and differences in Knowledge Management practice between SMEs in UK and Thailand within the manufacturing sector. The objective being to better understand and facilitate the transfer of good practice and lessons between the two countries. Questionnaires investigating Knowledge Management practice have been developed and distributed to SMEs in the Manufacturing Sector across the UK and Thailand. This paper reports on the responses of a total of 384 questionnaires from 36 manufacturing companies from the UK and Thailand. The study covers a range of manufacturing sectors including food and beverage, automotive and aerospace industries etc. Findings are reported from each of the two countries followed by a comparative statistical analysis of the similarities and differences. The results show a significant difference between the numbers of manufacturing SME’s that have implemented a formal knowledge management approach. With significantly more Thai organisations reporting the adoption of formal knowledge management approaches. Similarities exist in the encouragement given to employees for knowledge management activities. Significant difference exists in the barriers that the UK and Thai organisations face in capturing knowledge. The results have the potential to gain improvements and competitive advantage through understanding how knowledge management is influenced by geographic and cultural differences and the transfer of lessons and good practice between Thailand and the UK.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Management, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), Manufacturing, UK, Thailand

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 5 / Dec 2009  pp535‑662

Editor: Kimiz Dalkir

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Editorial

The 9th ICICKM conference, held at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was well attended by participants representing over 20 different countries. The international flavor of the conference continues to ensure a diverse range of papers as well as opportunities for valuable networking. As with all ICICKM gatherings, researchers, practitioners and students of KM were brought together to discuss the KM crossroads we find ourselves at in the year 2009.

Some of the key issues that emerged from the two days included a consensus that KM has evolved so we no longer need to convince people it is needed. We now need now to know how to “do KM” – that is, how to implement knowledge management in organizations in a more informed manner. In particular, the need for more how‑to guides, detailed rules, good validated practices and an overall quasi‑standard approach to KM implementation were noted as priority needs for the KM community. In addition, particular guidance is required concerning the KM teams (who should do what?) and how best to address tacit knowledge. Other issues concerned the specific components that should be present in a KM workspace and how this workspace can address the needs of different users who need to accomplish different sorts of tasks

While participants felt that we still have to convince some senior managers, we now also need to better address how to align KM processes so as to not create overhead. For example, what is the impact of KM on other parts of the organization such as training and IT units? How can we change peoples’ behaviours and how they think about the work they do? What are the new skills/competencies needed? How can they acquire them? How to integrate KM into business processes? How to integrate KM roles within existing jobs?

The good news is that the discipline and practice of KM has evolved – the bad news is that we still have a long way to go. The focus is now on how to do KM well. Educators need to focus on student competencies, skills and roles and responsibilities. Researchers need to focus on more evidence‑based and theory‑based KM. Practitioners need to focus on feedback from users and best practices.

The collection of papers in this special conference edition address the multitude of issues we currently face, and will continue to face, in the future. There is an excellent mix of practical case studies, practical tools such as intellectual capital measurement models in addition to more conceptual and theoretical approaches to solving crucial KM problems.

 

Keywords: academic education, avatars, ba, BRIC, competitive intelligence, complexity of choice, creative destruction, decision-making, developing countries, discipline, emerging markets, experiment, financial crisis, group interaction, growth drivers, human capital, Indian economy, Information Technology sector, intangible assets, Intellectual capital, intellectual value, KM in interconnected power systems, Knowledge Active Forgetting (KAF), knowledge capital, knowledge management implementation, management support systems, measurement, methods of assessment, paradigm, SET KM model, stakeholders, strategy, sustainable competitive advantage, technology, theoretical framework, UK car manufacturing industry, undergraduate degree program in Turkey, unlearning, virtual environments

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 2, ICICKM 2010 special issue / Apr 2011  pp85‑180

Editor: W.B. Lee

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Editorial

Prof. W.B. Lee is Director of the Knowledge Management Research Centre of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.    Prof. Lee is the editor of the Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, and International Journal of Knowledge and Systems Science. He established the Knowledge Solution Laboratory, the first of its kind in Hong Kong and has pioneered research and practice of knowledge management and knowledge audit in various organizations.  Prof. Lee and his team have launched Asia’s first on‑line MSc. Program in Knowledge Management.  His research interest  includes manufacturing systems, knowledge management, organizational learning and intellectual capital‑based management.

Editorial

The 7th International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management & Organizational Learning (ICICKM 2010) was hosted by the Knowledge Management Research Centre ,The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China, the first time in Asia.

The conference is well attended by more than 100 delegates from over 30 countries and regions.  This conference series is unique in the sense that it unifies all the important themes in this multidisciplinary area which can be pursued from either the knowledge management, intellectual capital management or organizational learning perspectives or any combinations of them.  The relationship between these themes is important. It is  only  through  the effective management of our knowledge assets  and the continuous  learning   of   individuals, teams and  organization  that we  are able to build the intellectual capital which is the underlying power driving corporation’s future growth.

Apart from the rich tacit knowledge exchange among delegates during the conference, the conference proceedings give a good record of papers delivered at the conference. Our thanks and appreciation go out to all those who presented papers and participated in the conference. Feedback to date from delegates and participants has been extremely positive. The support from departments within the University and our session Chairs and Keynote speakers is gratefully acknowledged. We also recognize the efforts of both the Executive and Conference Committees for their contribution to the double blind peer review process. Based on the input of the session chairs, we are able to select 10 papers of these to be published in this electronic Journal.  These cover a lot of topics including KM models, strategy, innovation, organizational leaning, and intellectual capital measurement, and provide various new insights to the readers.

Grant started by asking the question if knowledge Management (KM) is just another fab.   Through the lens of management fashion theory and a good review from bibliometric evidence he assures us that KM is unlike other management themes and is an enduring management activity. However, there is a potential conflict between the interests of practitioners and researchers. With different perspectives and prescriptions, Imani furthers the discussion by examining the KM strategy in 18 global companies and finds out how they are linked to the business strategy, which are either formulaic (to support routine activities) or embryonic (to address corporate strategic agenda).  On the other hand, Tan and Nasurdin focus on the influence of KM effectiveness on innovation in 171 large manufacturing firms in Malaysia and find out that the effectiveness of knowledge acquisition has a positive influence on both the technological and administrative (organizational) innovation. 

Another issue of concern to researchers in this conference is on how knowledge management  is linked to business performance and its evaluation. These findings and observations are reinforced in a study conducted by Rabhi in Saudi Arabia on the effect of KM on the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), including customer satisfaction, business savings and projects completed. Tiago et al. studied the relationship between the knowledge management and eBusiness activities by applying a structural equation model in a large database of KM activities of European and American firms. In a study of performance of a Quality Assurance Department conducted by Chan in an electronic factory, the performance of the quality management processes is related to the intellectual capital involved which is captured from a knowledge audit of the plant.

De Alvarenga Neto and Vieira from their Brazil experience described the four main components of KM Model in a Brazilian research  cooperation, that is, strategy, the environment (from social, information, cognitive and business), tool boxes, and  tangible and intangible outputs, and concluded that  for the model to be useful it should be collaboratively built  among  organization units instead of one from top‑down. Inter‑organizational and organizational learning has been recognized to be important for knowledge creation. Laursen, based on an empirical study of four organizational development projects at four Danish high schools revealdifferent perspectives on the projects set up by the staff and the management and how the perspectives have consequences  on what is actually learned by individuals as well as the whole organization.  As team learning and performance is closely related to the shared mental models of the team members, Zou and Lee explored the shared mental model of eight sigma project teams through collective sensemaking workshops conducted in an electronics factory in China. It was found that a high performance team perceived stronger interrelatedness between key teamwork concepts than average teams did.  An area that has been less studied is the effect of age diversity on knowledge transfer in workplace, which roots from the retirement of baby boom generation in many mature organizations. Wang and Dong undertook a study on some basic questions in intergenerational knowledge transfer such as analysis framework and transfer mechanism from a sociological perspective.  

Despite the diversity of topics they all tend to address on how KM performance is related to business goals, how the effectiveness is evaluated and how organizational learning takes place,  one feature of all these papers is that they all have data to support their cases and cut across various countries and cultures.  I hope this special issue serves as a timely and updated reference for the KM, IC and OL professions.

 

Keywords: Action Research, administrative innovation, BA, bibliometric analysis, data, development projects, educational partnerships, Embrapa, embryonic KM strategy, enabling contexts, , formulaic KM strategy, group quality assurance, human resource management practices, IC value tree, implementation of knowledge , innovation diffusion, innovative teaching, intellectual capital, intellectual capital statement, KM strategy, KM strategy as social practice, know-how, knowledge management effectiveness, knowledge management, , knowledge-based view of organizations, KPI, link between KM and business strategy, Malaysian manufacturing firms , management fashion, metrics, organizational coaching, organizational concepts, organizational learning, practicum, process innovation, product innovation, reflective practitioner, statistics, sustainable, taxonomy, the SET KM model, transfer of training, value added quality management processes, workplace development,

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 2, The Management of IC and Knowledge “in action” / Sep 2018  pp73‑154

Editor: Dr Maria Serena Chiucchi, Dr Susanne Durst

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Editorial

Special theme issue on The Management of IC and Knowledge “in action

‑bridging the gap between theory and practice

‑building bridges for different individuals interested in developing the field of IC/knowledge management

‑uniting different ways of thinking/mindsets to the benefit of IC/KM.

‑making room for dialogue on this matter.

 

Keywords: Intellectual capital, measurement, intangible assets, communities of practice, knowledge brokers, SME, Intellectual Capital, Churches, Assets and Liabilities, Organizational Culture, Value Creation, accountability, intellectual capital, spaces, logics, settings, corporate university, Knowledge Management, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), Manufacturing, UK, Thailand, Tacit Knowledge, Knowledge Accumulation, Knowledge Transfer, Tacit Knowledge Capacity, Higher Education, Universities

 

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