The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management and Higher Education: A UK Case Study  pp11-26

Desireé Joy Cranfield, John Taylor

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

This paper presents the initial findings of a case study conducted at seven Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom. The Case Study utilizes Stankosky's Knowledge Management (KM) pillars to enterprise learning — leadership, organization, technology and learning — as a lens to investigate and understand Knowledge Management practices and perceptions within Higher Education Institutions, looking at challenges of implementation within this sector. Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom are very complex institutions, with diverse backgrounds, history, culture, resources and missions. The University presents itself in today's knowledge economy with a dichotomy of priorities, one which aims to provide quality teaching and research activity, and the other, to ensure effective and efficient management and administration within an increasingly competitive market. Being a service, non‑profit organization ensures that the values of scholarship remain a very important aspect of its mission; yet, the external environment within which HEIs conduct their business today is rapidly changing, forcing HEIs to reflect on how they do 'business' given the external pressures they face. This case study uses the Grounded Theory methodology to begin to unpack the issues related to the implementation of Knowledge Management within this context. It focuses on two aspects of the case study — the characteristics of universities and academics that hinder or promote the implementation of KM, and the perceptions of Knowledge Management and its challenges for implementation within the HEI sector. Initial findings are presented.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, UK case study, grounded theory, higher education

 

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Journal Article

What is the Value of Knowledge Management Practices?  pp567-574

Fahmi Ibrahim, Vivien Reid

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

What are the appropriate sources from which to draw evidence about Knowledge Management (KM) and its added value to organisations? This paper attempts to answer this question, first examining the literature for approaches to measuring KM from the perspective of Intellectual Capital (IC) theory. However, findings indicated that many measurement methods or frameworks have limitations. Following the literature review, the researchers then approached KM practitioners, within the UK car manufacturing industry, and undertook in‑depth interviews in an attempt to understand how these organisations value their KM practices. The UK car manufacturing industry was selected because little previous research has been undertaken in this context, most previous studies having concentrated mainly on service industries. It was discovered that, in most of the organisations studied, the link between KM, business benefits and bottom line is almost axiomatic, especially amongst those who are enthusiastic advocates of KM. Drawing on the evidence from the in‑depth interviews, the paper concludes that there is an absence of linking mechanisms between value and measurement. This is due to the differences between the concept of a value and measurement approach and the importance of these two concepts to justify the outcome of KM practices. Recommendations are made through the development of a theoretical framework that includes both objective and subjective dimensions of KM measurement strategy.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, intellectual capital, uk car manufacturing industry, theoretical framework, value, measurement

 

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Journal Article

International Lessons in Knowledge Management: A Study of Western & Eastern Manufacturing SMEs  pp113-130

Chayaruk Thanee Tikakul, Avril Thomson

© Sep 2018 Volume 16 Issue 2, The Management of IC and Knowledge “in action”, Editor: Dr Maria Serena Chiucchi and Dr Susanne Durst, pp73 - 154

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Abstract

In today’s competitive business market, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are seeking to adopt supporting tools in order to survive. Many large organizations have been successfully implementing Knowledge Management with productivity and efficiency gains cited. SME’s on the other hand are less familiar with this practice with fewer published studies of Knowledge Management focusing on SMEs. Studies which draw global comparisons of Knowledge Management practices in SME’s are particularly rare. The aim of this study is to identify and investigate similarities and differences in Knowledge Management practice between SMEs in UK and Thailand within the manufacturing sector. The objective being to better understand and facilitate the transfer of good practice and lessons between the two countries. Questionnaires investigating Knowledge Management practice have been developed and distributed to SMEs in the Manufacturing Sector across the UK and Thailand. This paper reports on the responses of a total of 384 questionnaires from 36 manufacturing companies from the UK and Thailand. The study covers a range of manufacturing sectors including food and beverage, automotive and aerospace industries etc. Findings are reported from each of the two countries followed by a comparative statistical analysis of the similarities and differences. The results show a significant difference between the numbers of manufacturing SME’s that have implemented a formal knowledge management approach. With significantly more Thai organisations reporting the adoption of formal knowledge management approaches. Similarities exist in the encouragement given to employees for knowledge management activities. Significant difference exists in the barriers that the UK and Thai organisations face in capturing knowledge. The results have the potential to gain improvements and competitive advantage through understanding how knowledge management is influenced by geographic and cultural differences and the transfer of lessons and good practice between Thailand and the UK.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Management, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), Manufacturing, UK, Thailand

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 5 / Dec 2009  pp535‑662

Editor: Kimiz Dalkir

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Editorial

The 9th ICICKM conference, held at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was well attended by participants representing over 20 different countries. The international flavor of the conference continues to ensure a diverse range of papers as well as opportunities for valuable networking. As with all ICICKM gatherings, researchers, practitioners and students of KM were brought together to discuss the KM crossroads we find ourselves at in the year 2009.

Some of the key issues that emerged from the two days included a consensus that KM has evolved so we no longer need to convince people it is needed. We now need now to know how to “do KM” – that is, how to implement knowledge management in organizations in a more informed manner. In particular, the need for more how‑to guides, detailed rules, good validated practices and an overall quasi‑standard approach to KM implementation were noted as priority needs for the KM community. In addition, particular guidance is required concerning the KM teams (who should do what?) and how best to address tacit knowledge. Other issues concerned the specific components that should be present in a KM workspace and how this workspace can address the needs of different users who need to accomplish different sorts of tasks

While participants felt that we still have to convince some senior managers, we now also need to better address how to align KM processes so as to not create overhead. For example, what is the impact of KM on other parts of the organization such as training and IT units? How can we change peoples’ behaviours and how they think about the work they do? What are the new skills/competencies needed? How can they acquire them? How to integrate KM into business processes? How to integrate KM roles within existing jobs?

The good news is that the discipline and practice of KM has evolved – the bad news is that we still have a long way to go. The focus is now on how to do KM well. Educators need to focus on student competencies, skills and roles and responsibilities. Researchers need to focus on more evidence‑based and theory‑based KM. Practitioners need to focus on feedback from users and best practices.

The collection of papers in this special conference edition address the multitude of issues we currently face, and will continue to face, in the future. There is an excellent mix of practical case studies, practical tools such as intellectual capital measurement models in addition to more conceptual and theoretical approaches to solving crucial KM problems.

 

Keywords: academic education, avatars, ba, BRIC, competitive intelligence, complexity of choice, creative destruction, decision-making, developing countries, discipline, emerging markets, experiment, financial crisis, group interaction, growth drivers, human capital, Indian economy, Information Technology sector, intangible assets, Intellectual capital, intellectual value, KM in interconnected power systems, Knowledge Active Forgetting (KAF), knowledge capital, knowledge management implementation, management support systems, measurement, methods of assessment, paradigm, SET KM model, stakeholders, strategy, sustainable competitive advantage, technology, theoretical framework, UK car manufacturing industry, undergraduate degree program in Turkey, unlearning, virtual environments

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 2, The Management of IC and Knowledge “in action” / Sep 2018  pp73‑154

Editor: Dr Maria Serena Chiucchi, Dr Susanne Durst

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Editorial

Special theme issue on The Management of IC and Knowledge “in action

‑bridging the gap between theory and practice

‑building bridges for different individuals interested in developing the field of IC/knowledge management

‑uniting different ways of thinking/mindsets to the benefit of IC/KM.

‑making room for dialogue on this matter.

 

Keywords: Intellectual capital, measurement, intangible assets, communities of practice, knowledge brokers, SME, Intellectual Capital, Churches, Assets and Liabilities, Organizational Culture, Value Creation, accountability, intellectual capital, spaces, logics, settings, corporate university, Knowledge Management, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), Manufacturing, UK, Thailand, Tacit Knowledge, Knowledge Accumulation, Knowledge Transfer, Tacit Knowledge Capacity, Higher Education, Universities

 

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