The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

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Information about the European Conference on Intangibles and Intellectual Capital (ECIIC) is available here
 

Journal Article

The Influence of Technical, Social and Structural Factors on the Effective use of Information in a Policing Environment  pp65-76

Vince Hughes, Paul Jackson

© Jan 2005 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

Throughout the world, police services are increasingly adopting a proactive, intelligence‑led approach to crime management. These services operate within environments characterized by firm hierarchy, the command and control paradigm and high social sensitivity. The implementation of strategies for the exploitation of knowledge and information within such environments reveals particular insights into organizational knowledge management. Understanding these issues may be of great value, particularly as despite the commitment to intelligence led policing, the outcomes to date have not met expectations. This paper proposes that social and political issues have the ability to influence knowledge management strategy by drawing upon Pan and Scarbrough's socio‑technical model to show the progression of the intelligence‑led policing philosophy over the past decade.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Management, Business Intelligence, Public Service, Policing

 

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Journal Article

Measurement of Business Intelligence in a Finnish Telecom‑munications Company  pp83-90

Virpi Pirttimäki, Antti Lönnqvist, Antti Karjaluoto

© Dec 2005 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

Business intelligence (BI) is a managerial concept and tool that is used to help organisations to manage busi‑ness information and to make effective decisions. Measurement of BI is generally considered an important issue but at the same time it is considered difficult to carry out in practice. There is also a lack of research on the topic. The paper describes the current knowledge regarding the measurement of BI and makes a contribution on the currently small amount of empirical knowledge on the topic. The research is implemented by means of a literature review and action research.

 

Keywords: Business intelligence, case study, measure, measurement, telecommunications

 

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Journal Article

Diffusion Characteristics for Community Economic  pp227-232

Scott Erickson, Helen Rothberg

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ICICKM 2008, Editor: Kevin O'Sullivan, pp199 - 296

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Abstract

The intersection and common elements of the fields of knowledge management (KM) and competitive intelligence (CI) are receiving growing attention, particularly in the latter discipline. Not only are the two areas similar in terms of managing knowledge resources, albeit of different types in most cases, but the presence of competitive intelligence activities begs the question of how widely knowledge assets should be developed and shared, as well as how and whether said assets should be protected. One framework for developing a strategy to balance knowledge development with knowledge protection suggests that there are specific risks (knowledge management or KM Risk and competitive intelligence or CI Risk) that move in alternate directions as knowledge is developed and shared more widely. Previous work has measured KM potentialrisk and CI risk in a variety of industries, theoretically providing industry participants with a tool to more strategically develop and protect knowledge assets. This paper continues that work, including not only the industry evaluations but in‑depth analyses of firms within those industries, allowing for even deeper insights concerning optimal KMCI strategies. These insights are drawn from evaluation of the circumstances surrounding each industry and representative firm, including the nature of the knowledge assets (explicittacit), their complexity, and their specificity (stickiness). In a sense, this is an illustrative study, providing a template for how an individual firm can evaluate its own circumstances and better manage its knowledge assets. This paper provides another step forward in establishing a framework to help firms in discovering optimal strategies for developing and protecting knowledge by extending the discussion from industries to specific firms. Continuing to draw on the same framework that defines the KM and CI tradeoff, this paper examines illustrative firms in each KMCI situation, reviewing their circumstances and their relative place in the industry vis a vis KM and CI. From this result, we can continue to develop and refine theory and practice concerning how and when KM is practised as well as how and when CI activities are deployed and defended.

 

Keywords: intellectual capital, knowledge management, competitive intelligence, risk, strategy

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital in Tech Industries: a Longitudinal Study  pp559-566

Scott Erickson, Helen Rothberg

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

This paper reports on data collected over time on intellectual capital levels in three high‑tech industries. Data are also presented on competitive intelligence activity in the same industries. These data shed light on the idea that knowledge management is more strategic than is commonly portrayed, with the level of development and sharing of knowledge depending on circumstances at the national, industry, and firm level. Similarly, competitive intelligence offense and defense also vary according to environment. Given the evidence here that knowledge assets vary widely by industry and by firm, as do competitive intelligence efforts, organizations should scan their environments and adopt knowledge strategies appropriate to their circumstances.

 

Keywords: strategy, knowledge management, intellectual capital, competitive intelligence, technology

 

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Journal Article

Exploring Web 2.0 Applications as a Mean of Bolstering up Knowledge Management  pp1-9

Thomas Bebensee, Remko Helms, Marco Spruit

© Mar 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

Abstract: Web 2.0 applications aim at improving the interaction between users. Web 2.0 principles overlap with characteristics of knowledge management (KM) or could be applied to reshape KM practices. Applying Web 2.0 applications to KM has the potential to improve the sharing and creation of knowledge. However, little research has been conducted in this area. This research aims at identifying Web 2.0 applications for bolstering up organizations’ KM practices. An additional aspect addressed is how Web 2.0 applications for KM can be categorized and how they match different aspects of the KM strategy of an organization. The research examines the suitability of Web 2.0 applications in KM by conducting exploratory case studies in two student‑run organizations, which are an interesting research subject because their members are considered most open towards new technologies. The case studies aim at exploring which Web 2.0 applications are in place. Based on the findings we propose a framework for categorizing Web 2.0 applications for KM. The findings indicate that Web 2.0 applications may enhance KM and may even initiate a new era of KM. Moreover, the article provides a discussion of a number of Web 2.0 applications and proposes a way of categorizing these applications. The proposed framework allows assessing the use of Web 2.0 applications for KM and can be used as an orientation for the introduction of Web 2.0 applications in organizational KM. The research contributes to the general understanding of how Web 2.0 applications can be used in KM. The proposed framework for categorizing Web 2.0 applications provides an orientation for organizations that want to use these applications for bolstering up their KM practices.

 

Keywords: Web 2.0, collective intelligence, user-generated content, social computing, knowledge management, KM 2.0

 

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Journal Article

SPF 5 and Limitations to Investing in Knowledge Management  pp28-36

Scott Erickson, Helen Rothberg

© Mar 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

This paper will continue our work concerning the strategic management of intellectual capital. Based on the Rothberg/Erickson SPF framework which balances knowledge development with knowledge protection, we continue to explore differing circumstances and their impact on IC strategy. The framework differentiates between IC that needs to be aggressively developed by the firm (or not) and IC that is vulnerable to competitive intelligence incursion and needs protection (or not). Previously, we have looked at an environment within which substantial development of IC is necessary in order to be competitive but in which those same knowledge assets are at risk from competitive efforts to appropriate them (Erickson & Rothberg 2009b). In this paper, we will develop the scenario wherein aggressive development of IC may not be useful (highly tacit knowledge, difficult to share or apply in other situations) and little competitive intelligence activity is taking place (SPF 5 in the framework). In particular, we will characterize the nature of this environment in terms of theory, identify representative firms and industries, and apply data to the framework. Where appropriate, contrasts with other SPF environments will also be made.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, intellectual capital, competitive intelligence, SPF framework

 

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Journal Article

How to Innovate Management Through Intellectual Capital Statements ‑ Lessons Learned From the First Implementations in Brazil  pp256-267

Camilo Augusto Sequeira, Markus Will, Eloi Fernández y Fernandez, Kai Mertins

© Jul 2013 Volume 11 Issue 3, ICICKM 2012, Editor: Fernando Chaparro Osorio, pp185 - 279

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Abstract

Abstract: Recent initiatives have shown that it is time to think about new ways of managing companies, particularly in emerging economies. Mertins et al (2012), points out that, “In the rapidly emerging Brazilian economy, intangible assets become a key success factor for sustainable growth”. As experiences in the fast moving city and state of Rio de Janeiro have shown, the development of systematic management procedures for these intangible assets is especially valuable for fast growing small and medium‑sized enterprises (SMEs) in order to serve as a solid backbone for an increasingly knowledge‑based economy. Another initiative described by Sequeira et al (2012) highlights that Brazil has been evolving into a knowledge society dealing with political changes, globalization, new technologies, and new global competitors, such as China. The need to enhance companies´ and, by extension, countries´ competitiveness has grown rapidly. It is, therefore, evident that organisations and particularly government policies need to redress some critical competitiveness issues, most notably the establishment of the Competitive Intelligence System as a strategic tool. Without such tool, organisations and the country will find it difficult to position themselves within the global marketplace. Taking into account the main conclusions of the two initiatives described above, and the unique circumstances of organically grown organizations in the Brazilian business environment, this paper discusses the challenge of integrating the Intellectual Capital Statement ‑ ICS into a comprehensive strategic change process. In order to promote sustainable business development in an emerging economy, the ICS has to be used to establish a continuous improvement cycle in the individual company, focusing on practical actions for maintaining and developing its intangible assets to ensure future competition capability.

 

Keywords: innovating management, competitive intelligence, intellectual capital, intangible assets, knowledge economy, Brazil, oil and gas, SMEs

 

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Journal Article

The Role of Intellectual Capital in Creating and Adding Value to Organizational Performance: A Conceptual Analysis  pp185-192

Waheed Akbar Bhatti, Dr Arshad Zaheer

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 3, Editor: Ken Grant, pp153 - 216

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Abstract

Abstract: The rapid growth of knowledge economy in the last two decades has changed management styles. Organizations knowledge strategy should be driven from business strategy to ensure development of knowledge culture. Such a culture ensures knowledge a ctivities, namely acquiring, sharing, creating, transforming and utilizing. The knowledge environment will encourage and promote innovative processes. The feedback from external environment and experience from previous projects will help in research and development. The amalgamation of new and known knowledge will help devise ways and means of transformation for effective and efficient performance. A conceptual model is developed to study the moderating role of intellectual capital competencies in know ledge strategy‑organizational performance relationship. The research studies how intellectual capital competencies moderate the knowledge strategy—organizational performance relationship. The novelty of this research is studying .relationship of Knowledg e Strategy‑Organizational performance trough moderating role of process innovation, research and development integration of past projects and market intelligence. This research will educate and create awareness in managers for nurturing organizations inte llectual capital and managing their daily affairs effectively. It will guide in devising better strategies, processes and methods to manage intellectual capital. This will help create value through innovations and improved performance.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Knowledge strategy, intellectual capital, value creation, process innovation, research and development, market intelligence, performance

 

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